Sunday, 30 April 2017

Summary Writing Tips 2

Simple Summary Writing Guidelines


1. Read the texts quickly for main ideas (skim)
2. Look again at the passages to ensure you have all the main ideas (scan).
3. Underline the most important words (marking).
4. Write down the key words in simple sentences.
5. Compare the original text with yours to ensure that you have all the essential information.



Things to Remember

1. Stick to the word limit.
2.  Use your own words
3. Avoid Repetition
4. Avoid examples, statistics and other Persuasive Techniques
5. Avoid descriptive words and phrases (including figures of speech).
6. connect the points suitably and write proper paragraphs.



Summary Writing Practice 

Summary Writing 1  (disregard the mark scheme)



Here are some additional tips. You can start your video at 2:55 for the summary writing information.



Reference Text: A Complete English Course for Secondary Schools



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Saturday, 29 April 2017

A Layout of the 2017 English A & B CSEC Exam

We are kickstarting out CSEC English A and B Exam countdown. I wanted to start by reviewing the layout of the English A and B Exam; so that you remember exactly what will come on the paper. Remember to come back EACH day for tips and an overview of each section of the English A and B exam paper.


English A 

English A  Paper 1

The duration of the exam is 1 hr, 30 mins

English A Paper 2

The duration of the exam is 2 hrs, 30 mins


60 Multiple Choice Questions

Questions 1-20

These questions can be a combination of the following questions:
ü  Synonyms,
ü  Antonyms,
ü  Sentence Completion,
ü  Error Recognition,
ü  Usage,
ü  Construction shift,
ü  Equivalent Sentences

Questions 21-60

Comprehension Passages
These passages can the following types of writing:
ü  narrative,
ü  expository,
ü  persuasive or
ü  descriptive

 You might also receive a poem.


Section A- Summary

1 Compulsory Summary Writing Question
30 marks

Section B- Comprehension

2 Compulsory Short Answer Comprehensions

2 comprehension passages
OR
1 Comprehension passage & 1 poem

30 marks
Section C

2 Short Story Questions
&
1 Description Writing Question

Answer 1 question from this section

35 marks
Section D

2 Argumentative Essay questions

Answer 1 question from this section

35 marks











































Click the links below to review the following sections:


English B

PAPER 01
Duration: 1hour and 30 mins
 PAPER 02
Duration: 2 hours
This paper consists of three questions (a drama extract, a poem and a prose extract).

All questions are compulsory (must be answered).

Short Answers

Each section is worth 20 marks

This paper consists of twelve questions, arranged in three sections

SECTION A: DRAMA
v  Questions 1 and 2 : Shakespeare
v  Questions 3 and 4: Modern Drama

SECTION B: POETRY
v  Questions 5 and 6

SECTION C: PROSE FICTION
v  Questions 6 and 7: Novel
v  Questions 11 and 12: Short Story

You are expected to answer THREE (3) questions, ONE question from EACH section.

Each question is marked out of 35 marks. 25 marks are allotted for content and 10 for grammar and organization. 

You MUST write in the essay format and develop all responses fully.

Only texts that are on the prescribed list for the examination must be used to answer the questions.


Click the title of the play, novel, short story or poem to see additional information.

The English B exam is based on the following texts, poems and short stories:

DRAMA

The Lion and the Jewel by Wole Soyinka
DRAMA

Julius Caesar by William Shakespeare
PROSE FICTION

Frangipani House by Beryl Gilroy

PROSE FICTION

Things Fall Apart by Chinua Achebe

SHORT STORY

1.      ‘Mom Luby and the Social Worker’ by Kristin Hunter
2.      The Man of the House’ by Frank O’Connor
3.      The Day the World Almost Came to an End by Pearl Crayton
4.      ‘Raymond’s Run’ by Tony Cade Bambara
5.      ‘Berry’ by Langston Hughes

SHORT STORY

6.      ‘Shabine’ by Hazel Simmons- McDonald
7.      ‘Emma’ by Carolyn Cole
8.      To Da-duh, in Memoriam by Paule Marshall
9.      The Two Grandmothers by Olive Senior
10.  ‘Georgia and Them There United States’ by Velma Pollard



POETRY

1. Dreaming Black Boy’ by James Berry
2. Theme for English B’ by Langston Hughes
3. A Stone’s Throw’ by Elma Mitchell
4. Once Upon A Time’ by Gabriel Okara
5. It is the constant Image of your Face’ by Dennis Brutus
6. Test Match Sabina Park’ by Stewart Brown
7. Le Loupgarou’ by Derek Walcott
8. Ol’ Higue’ by Mark McWatt
9. This is a Dark Time, My Love’ by Martin Carter
10. ‘Dulce Et Decorum Est’ by Wilfred Owen
11. The Woman Speaks to the Man who has Employed Her Son’ by Lorna Goodison
12.  ‘Forgive My Guilt’ by Robert P. Tristram Coffin
13. West Indies, U.S.A.’ by Stewart Brown
14. Sonnet Composed Upon Westminster Bridge’ by William Wordsworth
15. ‘South’ by Kamau Brathwaite
16. ‘Orchids’ by Hazel Simmons-McDonald
17. A Contemplation Upon Flowers’ by Henry King
18. “A Lesson for this Sunday” by Derek Walcott
19. ‘Because I could not stop for Death’ by Emily Dickinson
20. “Death came to see me in Hot Pink Pants” by Heather Royes
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  Click the title of the play, novel, short story or poem to see additional information.

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Thursday, 27 April 2017

To Kill A Mockingbird Analysis of chapters 15-21

Again, Scout's innocent perspective makes the reader unaware of the possible violence outside the Maycomb jail in chapter 16. The men who come that evening are a mob with the intention of killing Tom Robinson. Atticus was staying outside the jail with the hope of disarming the situation. When Scout and the boys arrive on the scene, they don't truly comprehend what is happening. Scout does not understand these men intend to kill Tom before he can even go to trial. It is the children's presence that disrupts the mob and eventually causes them to leave. The children make the men awkwardly aware of their cowardice and shame.
Image result for to kill a mockingbird
When Mayella Ewell takes the stand, she calls into question the character of the white men in the courtroom. The fact that her word is not automatically taken over the word of a black man causes her to lash out and accuse the men of not being true gentlemen. Given the age-old code of Southern chivalry, this is a piercing accusation, and one that wins the case. The true Southern gentlemen is always supposed to defend the character of a white woman. Despite the certainty of most of the people in the courtroom, Tom Robinson will go to jail for this crime no matter what the facts present. A fear resides in Maycomb, and the South of this era, to render any other verdict. Old habits of racism and false nobility, like the code of the Southern gentleman, die very hard. It is seen as a victory that the jury took so long to deliberate. Atticus knew from the beginning he could never win this case, but that perhaps he could cause the town to reflect on their notions of race and justice. In this regard, the trial was a success.



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Tuesday, 25 April 2017

Little Boy Crying by Mervyn Morris



Stanza 1
The poem begins with a description of a child crying. However, his cries seem harsh and fierce “Your laughter metamorphosed into howl”.  This also suggests that the child is normally a happy one and something happened to have changed his happiness.

The last line in the stanza informs us that the reason why the child is crying is because he has been beaten “the quick slap struck”.

The little boy is also staring at the parent hoping that he might be feeling guilty for hitting him. This might mean that the child is trying to play on the parent’s emotion “you stand there angling for a moment’s hint”.

Stanza 2
It is important to note that the stanza is giving the point of view of the parent. The parent is imagining that the child is demonizing him for hitting him “The ogre towers above you, that grim giant,// empty of feeling a colossal cruel”.

From this, we can understand that the parent thinks that the child believes that he is cruel and evil for hitting him and therefore is thinking of ways to overcome or get away from the parent.

Stanza 3
Poet makes it clear that the father loves his son. However, he is slapping him for is own good. He also suggests that the father is hurt by the son’s tears and would do anything to make him stop crying. “This fierce man longs to lift you//……” Yet, the lesson must be taught.

Stanza 4
Maybe this stanza suggests that no matter that there are often important behaviour or lessons children must learnt by children.

Themes

Parent – Child Relationship
The father seems to be firm and strict with his son. Although he loves him he does not allow him to have his own way.

Childhood Experiences

The little boy experiences pain and resentment for his parent. Unlike Ana, his childhood is not one that is carefree without any consequences for undesired behaviour.    

Parenting
The father tries to be a good parent. In his eyes there are some lessons that his son must learn. Therefore, he carries out physical punishment so that he can learn these lessons.



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Monday, 24 April 2017

Sample English SBA A and B Reflection




This sample reflect was created by teachers of the Rusea's High School after an English SBA workshop I conducted. The teachers watched the above video and pretended that they were writing a reflection based on the Effects of scamming on Individuals. Please note that this sample is based only on one artefact.


While watching the video on ‘The Effects of Scamming on Victims,’ I was overwhelmed by different emotions. The video portrayed the family of a victim who was expressing how scamming led their family member to suicide. Initially, I felt extremely ashamed because Jamaica is my country and is branded as ‘scamming capital.’ It is quite disturbing to see these happenings in my country. I was also empathetic towards the victims as they suffered a great loss. Vulnerable and older people seem to be the target, as the video showed. The video also showed the despair of both the families and the victims who are often left with nothing. This video has inspired me to speak against scamming as it is wrong and can cause serious physical and psychological damages to the victims and their families who are often left to pick up the pieces. This video reminded me of the infamous Cash Plus scandal which affected hundreds of Jamaicans in a negative way.

The writer’s use of Language Techniques has helped me to greater analyse the piece thus drawing conclusions as well. The use of formal language by the reporter and the Lottery Scamming Task Force Police was easily understandable by the researcher. The use of the term “Lottery Scamming” and providing a simple definition was quite effective in allowing anyone without prior knowledge of the phenomena to understand what it is. In addition, I could identify with victims who were interviewed as they utilized simple structured sentences that appealed to the researcher’s emotion causing her to be sympathetic towards victims and angry towards the ‘Scammers’. This video has helped me to really understand how the victims are negatively affected by this gruesome act and feel the exact emotions they feel through the tone of despair, disappointment and sadness utilized in the video.


The sub-theme ‘How Scamming Affects the Victims’ has reshaped my thoughts and intentions about attractive activity of scamming. Having witnessed through the video how scamming has resulted in a victim taking his own life because he realized that he was scammed out of his life’s earnings, has truly touched me. As a result, I would want anyone to feel so victimized that they commit suicide. As a result, I would discourage persons around her who scam. On the other hand, even though I am compelled I may not report to the authorities any incidents of scamming as they cannot be trusted. In order not to lose her life, I will only speak to family members and friends she is close to about discontinuing such activity.


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Sunday, 23 April 2017

Improving Comprehension Skills- Making Inferences

Inference is a "foundational skill" because inferring requires higher order thinking skills, it can be difficult for many students. However, it can be taught through explicit instruction in inferential strategies

What It Means To Infer

Stopping to think and rereading if necessary

Connecting what you know to the words and pictures

Recapping what has happened so far

Asking a question about what could happen next

Paying attention to details in the pictures

Thinking about what the words could mean

Talking to yourself and then stating an opinion about what you have read

Trying to picture it in your mind

Combining all the clues left by the author

Coming up with a conclusion, guess, or bigger idea

How to Teach Inference
                                                                                                                                                                      
One simplified model for teaching inference includes the following assumptions:

a. We need to find clues to get some answers.
c. We need to add those clues to what we already know or have read.
d. There can be more than one correct answer.

e. We need to be able to support inferences.


Four questions that can be posed to students (Marzano 2010) to facilitate a discussion about inferences are:

1. What is my inference?
2. What information did I use to make this inference?
3. How good was my thinking?
4. Do I need to change my thinking?


   Resource sites: wvde.state.wv.us/strategybank; http://www.readingrockets.org



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Saturday, 22 April 2017

Garvey the Musical : Roots Reggae Rock



Garvey the Musical : Roots Reggae Rock  is written and directed By Michael Holgate.

The University Players, under the direction of Michael Holgate has created an empowering musical theatre production based on the life and impact of Marcus Mosiah Garvey. The production, GARVEY, Roots Reggae Rock includes drama, singing and dancing performed by students and alumni of the University of the West Indies.

The story is part civics lesson on the life of National Hero Marcus Garvey and part empowerment education for young people as well as general audiences. It is an edutainment production, which highlights the valuable teachings in self-love and acceptance from Jamaica’s first National Hero, a first class Jamaican philosopher.

The show runs from May 12-28, 2017 at the Philip Sherlock Centre for the Creative Arts, University of the West Indies, Mona Campus.

Please call 1(876) 927 1456, 1(876) 9271047 or 1(876) 367 7953 for more details.

Friday, 21 April 2017

CSEC English Facebook Study Group


Join our CSEC English Made Easy Study Group for tips, sample questions, past papers, etc.

Click Here 



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Thursday, 20 April 2017

Things Fall Apart Historical Background


Things Fall Apart is an English-language novel by Nigerian author Chinua Achebe published in 1958 by William Heinemann Ltd in the UK. It is seen as the archetypal modern African novel in English, one of the first to receive global critical acclaim. It is a staple book in schools throughout Africa and is widely read and studied in English-speaking countries around the world. The title of the novel comes from a William Butler Yeats' poem, "The Second Coming".


Image result for thing fall apartThe novel shows the life of Okonkwo, a leader and local wrestling champion in Umuofia—one of a fictional group of nine villages in Nigeria, inhabited by the Igbo people (in the novel, "Ibo"). It describes his family and personal history, the customs and society of the Igbo, and the influence of British colonialism and Christian missionaries on the Igbo community during the late nineteenth century.

SETTING
Time/Place

There is no specific date for the events in the novel.
Based on these same events, however, we can surmise that the novel takes place during the early nineteenth century to the early twentieth century.
The story occurs in Igbo territory in Nigeria.
Specifically, the plot unwinds in the villages of Umuofia, Mbaino and Mbanta.


Historical Context

British expansion had just gained relevance in the African interior.
Many of the missionaries, explorers and traders thought that the interior of Africa was a wild and dangerous place that was inhabited by primitive people.
There was a scramble for territorial control of Africa between 1870 and 1900 for two reasons:
1. Africa was an untapped source for raw materials that could fuel the Industrial  Revolution in Europe.

 2. Trade could be enhanced by using Africa as a stop off port on the way to the Middle East.

This scramble opened the door to the missionary's need to 'civilize' and 'enlighten' the population of this new colony/continent.
With the infiltration of these missionaries came churches and schools, both of which were instrumental in the colonizing process.

The over arching result of the European infiltration was:
                    1. The indigenous cultural and religious practices were rejected and viewed as uncivilized and heathen.
                    2. Tribal practices were outlawed.
                    3. Local judicial systems were replaced.
                    4. Trading posts and monetary systems replaced barter and rural systems of trade.


Social Context

The men are dominant and the women are subservient.
Social mobility is possible through personal achievement.
Success is measured by the number of barns one owns and titles that their wealth can buy.
The society is polygamous, and social prestige is accorded to a man that can afford to support many wives.
The acquisition of a bride is a solemn event that involves ritual and ceremony.
Children are a sign of virility.
Villagers feel a sense of obligation to help each other.
Being hospitable to each other is very important.
Conversation involves ritual - palm-wine, kola nut, alligator pepper - and proverbs.
Members of the clan are prohibited from killing each other.

Political Context

Approval of the entire clan is necessary before any major decision is made.
Egwugwu, the representative of the ancestral spirits, are integral in administering tribal justice.
Ndichie, the elders of the village, have a place of honour in the clan and their advice is respected.
The priests get their power from the Oracle, and their decisions are never questioned.

Religious Context

Ordinary people gain access to the gods through the Oracle.
The gods do not show themselves physically, but speak through the priests or priestesses.
The ancestors, embodied physically in the egwugwu, are revered.
There is the belief that the ogbanje, or spirit child, returns to plague its mother, ensuring that all her children die.
Twins are taboo and placed in the 'evil forest'.
The concept of the chi, or a person's identity in the spirit land, is important in Igbo religious beliefs.
A good chi can mean success, while a bad chi can mean misfortune.


 Economic Context

Sharecropping provides a financial base for young men who do not inherit a barn from their fathers, or are simply in a financial crises.
Cowrie shells are the medium of exchange.
The family unit provides the basis for economic success.
Each individual, even the children, has a specialized role that contributes to the family's financial success.




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